Author: Paul Waxman

Methyl Ethel

GIG REVIEW: Methyl Ethel at the Howler (Thursday, February 23rd)

Perth natives Methyl Ethel recently exploded with popularity as their 2016 debut album “Oh Inhuman Spectacle” propelled them into fame, producing triple J favourites such as “Rogues”, and the ninety-seventh place in the Hottest-100-of-2015 tune, “Twilight Driving”. After being signed to 4AD records amongst the ranks of Future Islands, and Purity Ring and completing a US tour, the band returned to their home soil to promote and reveal previously unheard songs to be featured on their follow-up album “Everything Is Forgotten” for a show at Brunswick’s The Howler. Supported by similarly dream-pop bands, Quivers and Totally Mild, the night was sure to be a laid-back evening of unique art-pop. Read more …

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Fantastic Tips and Where To Find Them “O-Show” Review

O-Week, or Orientation Week, has finally arrived and feelings of anxiety, nervousness and apprehension are certainly brimming in most of students’ minds. These sentiments are shared between first year students, and returning students as some are experiencing the University for the first time or the last time. Thankfully, the MUST (Monash University Student Theatre) company have developed a unique and succinct method of easing everyone’s woe in their hilariously educational “O-Show”, Fantastic Tips and Where To Find Them. Read more …

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GIG REVIEW: Camp Cope with Alex Lahey and RVG @ The Old Bar

Recently, the Melbourne music scene has seen an outrageously productive surge in brilliant, unique talent. Venues within the city’s varying suburbs have inspired and have encouraged many world-renowned acts such as Crowded House, Hunters & Collectors, The Avalanches and The Cat Empire. In more recent time and even within 2016, a handful of talented Melbournian bands emerged onto the scene bringing with them inventive new ways to hear and look at music. Alex Lahey and Camp Cope are no exception to this. Both bands have a refreshing and energetic sound on record, and their live sound is another thing altogether. The two female-fronted bands banded together last Sunday on the 16th of January at the Old Bar returning to where their stardom began.

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Jackie

ADVANCE REVIEW: JACKIE

The genre of biography pictures has many differing sub-genres and styles. A film reviewed last week, The Founder, lies somewhere within the “based on a true story” genre, where the ‘story’ told spans several years. Films like this include The Blind Side, Precious or The Social Network, which tell stories lasting many years. Another sub-genre within this genre is the ‘based on a true event’ genre, which chronicles the key moments within a single event. These kinds of films are dedicated much more to informing the audience of a certain event, especially an event that requires explanation, or perhaps, was never properly exposed in the first place. Patriot’s Day and Captain Philips are two other films within this genre that concentrated on one specific event, the former, the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing, and the latter, a pirate raid of a boat. Similar to this, Jackie is a film that intensely focuses on the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated and the chaotic week that followed.

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MOVIE REVIEW: The Founder

The use of “true events” in film has been a part of the medium ever since its creation in the 19th Century. Early movies retold authentic tales of “heroic” bushrangers, stories of mutinying Russian revolutionaries and dramatizations of a long forgotten military ambush. Of course, as technology advanced and audience’s interests altered, retellings slowly changed to adaptations with configurations. A “based upon true events”, with an emphasis on based, movie is a fantastic way to reflect upon a national tragedy or even reveal a once untold story through the magic of cinema. An important part of this type of film is its educational potential. One could learn about a certain event by reading a monotonously long history book, or they could pursue an iconic figure by studying newspaper articles or researching the depths of the internet, or they could digest this information in a fast, and simple to comprehend movie. Ironically enough, “biography pictures” or biopics are sort of the junk food of historical reflection and enlightenment. It’s quick, palatable; it’s even portable now, and lacks, perhaps, the finesse or the detail of a textbook. In our time, “based on true events” biopics have upsurged in popularity since 1899, and have dominated the past 2 decades’ “Best Film” OSCARS. With recent releases honouring Boston Globe journalists, a person discovering their transgender identity and Martin Luther King, pioneer biopic director, John Lee Hancock decided to investigate the peculiar origins of worldwide fast food franchise ‘McDonald’s’ in his latest film: The Founder. Read more …

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FILM REVIEW: La La Land

Musicals, especially stage musicals, have become incredibly popular in the past few decades. Hamilton made learning history “cool” again by modernising it musically; Wicked revealed the story behind the Wizard of Oz through emotional, storytelling ballads and Spiderman the Musical…happened. The silver screen was also once honoured with the presence of wonderfully catchy and timeless musicals such as West Side Story, Singin’ in the Rain and The Sound of Music. Recent entries into this genre haven’t been necessarily awful but they haven’t been entirely original either, and although Into the Woods and Jersey Boys were fantastic, the former was once a novel and the latter was adapted from its stage counterpart. The refreshing and refined insanity of early comedy-musicals is absent from our modern movie musicals. It is clear that it is Director Damien Chazelle’s divine right to inoculate musical nonsense and magic back into film as La La Land, his third feature film, is the perfect, nostalgic template for what a musical movie should be. Read more …

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RadMon Recommends: Please Like Me

Situational Comedies, or as they are more commonly known, “Sit-Coms”, have been through interesting phases of development since I Love Lucy graced people’s tiny black and white boxes in the 1950s. In the 66 or so years that sit-coms have been popular, shows within this genre have been fake documentaries, candid peeks into “real” family lives and tales of “nerds” trying to exist in the real world. And although these shows attempted to represent “situations” between a family or a group of friends, no other modern show comes even close to being as realistically situational as Josh Thomas’ Comedy, Please Like Me. Read more …

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GIG REVIEW: Tribute Band Night at Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy: The New Fellas and The Smokes

Ever since the Buggs and Elvis impersonators became popular, tribute bands have always been a staple in music entertainment. Tribute cover bands serve as a great way for bands who are perhaps getting too old to perform, or the more morbid side of it, for bands whose members are no longer with us, to be injected, to avoid a pun here, with more life. Unlike cheese, bands do not get riper with age but tribute bands are sort of a way to pick a rotting cheese off the shelf and repackaging it and calling it “blue cheese” and “decadent”. Many would argue the Strokes aren’t getting worse with age, despite being in the game for over a decade now, and people who’ve listened to their most recent Future, Present, Past EP would agree they are losing their touch a bit. But the Strokes are well into middle age now and have lost touch with their 2001, Is This It selves. The band no longer play dingy, and smoky, packed venues, nor do they indulge in on-stage antics with intense audience participation, tossing microphone stands like javelins. Luckily enough for us, The Smokes, pulled us into a time machine, said “where we’re going, we don’t need synthesisers!”, and took us back to a time around 2006 where The Strokes were in full swing and were filled with youth and energy.

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black-mirror

Upon Reflection: “Black Mirror”

WARNING: DISCUSSION OF PLOT POINTS! SPOILERS!

Modern Television has been dominated by countless “quality” TV shows, with ongoing stories spanning multiple seasons, with plenty of inter-season cliffhangers, and numbers of characters names to memorise to keep up with continuity. With these epic tales like Game of ThronesThe Walking Dead and Breaking Bad being centre stage on our televisions, dramatic anthology shows are dearly missed. Anthology shows (anthology meaning a different plot and cast of characters between episodes and seasons), need no memorisations of which character is which and why that character is out for revenge and so forth. Shows like The Twilight Zone and Goosebumps scared us to death, and the more revolutionary and recent entry into this genre American Horror Story, spooked us and entertained us. But a new anthology series has arrived, albeit 5 years ago but its 3rd season has just premiered on Netflix, to change the way we view horror / sci-fi anthology series, and TV stories for that matter. This show doesn’t contain haunted houses, parallel universes or cursed masks fusing to someone’s face, nor are there supernatural beings, ghouls nor spirits, Black Mirror nosedives headfirst into the most terrifying thing in human existence: inevitability, and the future.

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