Author: Paul Waxman

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RadMon Recommends: Please Like Me

Situational Comedies, or as they are more commonly known, “Sit-Coms”, have been through interesting phases of development since I Love Lucy graced people’s tiny black and white boxes in the 1950s. In the 66 or so years that sit-coms have been popular, shows within this genre have been fake documentaries, candid peeks into “real” family lives and tales of “nerds” trying to exist in the real world. And although these shows attempted to represent “situations” between a family or a group of friends, no other modern show comes even close to being as realistically situational as Josh Thomas’ Comedy, Please Like Me. Read more …

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GIG REVIEW: Tribute Band Night at Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy: The New Fellas and The Smokes

Ever since the Buggs and Elvis impersonators became popular, tribute bands have always been a staple in music entertainment. Tribute cover bands serve as a great way for bands who are perhaps getting too old to perform, or the more morbid side of it, for bands whose members are no longer with us, to be injected, to avoid a pun here, with more life. Unlike cheese, bands do not get riper with age but tribute bands are sort of a way to pick a rotting cheese off the shelf and repackaging it and calling it “blue cheese” and “decadent”. Many would argue the Strokes aren’t getting worse with age, despite being in the game for over a decade now, and people who’ve listened to their most recent Future, Present, Past EP would agree they are losing their touch a bit. But the Strokes are well into middle age now and have lost touch with their 2001, Is This It selves. The band no longer play dingy, and smoky, packed venues, nor do they indulge in on-stage antics with intense audience participation, tossing microphone stands like javelins. Luckily enough for us, The Smokes, pulled us into a time machine, said “where we’re going, we don’t need synthesisers!”, and took us back to a time around 2006 where The Strokes were in full swing and were filled with youth and energy.

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Upon Reflection: “Black Mirror”

WARNING: DISCUSSION OF PLOT POINTS! SPOILERS!

Modern Television has been dominated by countless “quality” TV shows, with ongoing stories spanning multiple seasons, with plenty of inter-season cliffhangers, and numbers of characters names to memorise to keep up with continuity. With these epic tales like Game of ThronesThe Walking Dead and Breaking Bad being centre stage on our televisions, dramatic anthology shows are dearly missed. Anthology shows (anthology meaning a different plot and cast of characters between episodes and seasons), need no memorisations of which character is which and why that character is out for revenge and so forth. Shows like The Twilight Zone and Goosebumps scared us to death, and the more revolutionary and recent entry into this genre American Horror Story, spooked us and entertained us. But a new anthology series has arrived, albeit 5 years ago but its 3rd season has just premiered on Netflix, to change the way we view horror / sci-fi anthology series, and TV stories for that matter. This show doesn’t contain haunted houses, parallel universes or cursed masks fusing to someone’s face, nor are there supernatural beings, ghouls nor spirits, Black Mirror nosedives headfirst into the most terrifying thing in human existence: inevitability, and the future.

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REVIEW: Gameshow by Two Door Cinema Club

The long-awaited sequel to Irish poppers Two Door Cinema Club’s 2012 smashing album Beacon, releases this Friday (14/10/2016). With 2010’s Tourist History obliterating people’s expectations for indie pop, and its follow-up, the aforementioned Beacon, solidifying the band’s consistent reputation for obliterations of the mould and listener’s assumptions, ensured the band’s restricted and small discography would be remembered as a placeholder for modern indie-pop and indie-disco.

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