Category: Announcements

cool off zone

PODCAST: Cool Off Zone E06

Hosted by Helen and Lola

 

This Episode features songs that best describes personalities and individuals at different stages in Life. We had listeners who suggested that some of these songs actually speaks a lot about themselves at a point in their lives and some of the songs also summarises their personality traits.

Without getting to know our listeners personally, how easy is it for you to figure why a song was chosen.

Hint: it could be the lyrics or title.

 

Enjoy!!!!!

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Ret Blue

Notice: A Compulsory Meeting for Returning Presenters

***Please be aware this notice is only for Semester One Presenters hoping to return to the station in Semester Two — New Presenter Applications will open later in the week**

This is the event for the Compulsory Meeting/Training Session for ALL PRESENTERS HOPING TO RETURN FOR SEMESTER on Friday the 22nd of July at 12:00pm. It is extremely crucial that any presenters hoping to return for the new semester attend.

With Semester 2 fast approaching, we are now offering all Semester One presenters the opportunity to express interest in our new timetable, before show applications open to new presenters next week. Read more …

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Humon #4 – July 15th 2016

The Lives of Humans at Monash…. Curated by Hugh Murray

I love J Cole. I know this interview was meant to be about the difference between Fiji and Australia but J Cole is bae. You know how rap talks about sex and drugs. Now that I think about it, J Cole’s songs are about sex. I was going to say that J Cole’s isn’t like that but I guess he is. But not about the drug life. I think I like him because of his vibe. He’s not society’s ideal of conventional beauty, but he’s still cute. Something you can wave your hand up in the air for: I call it the 90 degree right-angle right arm basketball tap. It’s something I can listen to when it’s 3am, my best friend’s door is locked and I can’t sleep.

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REVIEW: PEP Productions’ “The Laramie Project”

“The Laramie Project” is a script I’ve read and studied many times before, but actually have never seen performed live on stage before. Constructed purely from interviews conducted by the the Tectonic Theatre Company with the locals of Laramie, the play details the life and death of Matthew Sheppard, who at the age of 21 fell victim to a vicious hate crime, tortured and murdered by local boys Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson on the outskirts of his home town. The play serves to translate to the audience the effect Sheppard’s murder had on the global debates regarding homophobia and hate crime legislation, as well as the impact it had on the small town in which it occurred, through the format of “Verbatim Theatre”. Due to both the abnormal nature of the play’s design as well as the confronting nature of its content, “The Laramie Project” remains one of the most difficult plays to perform and get right. However, due to an incredible amount of effort, talent and reverence, it is a play that PEP Productions absolutely nails. Read more …

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Humon #4 – June 15th 2016

The Lives of Humans at Monash…. Curated by Hugh Murray // 

I love J Cole. I know this interview was meant to be about the difference between Fiji and Australia but J Cole is bae. You know how rap talks about sex and drugs. Now that I think about it, J Cole’s songs are about sex. I was going to say that J Cole’s isn’t like that but I guess he is. But not about the drug life. I think I like him because of his vibe. He’s not society’s ideal of conventional beauty, but he’s still cute. Something you can wave your hand up in the air for: I call it the 90 degree right-angle right arm basketball tap. It’s something I can listen to when it’s 3am, my best friend’s door is locked and I can’t sleep.

Read more …

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REVIEW: ARTEFACT THEATRE COMPANY’S “PROOF”

“Proof” marks the second time this year where I’ve had the privilege of attending the debut performance of a brand new company and, to put it plainly, once again Melbourne has gained yet another strong platform upon which to promote and showcase groundbreaking theatre. The company, Artefact Theatre, derives its name from the idea that “powerful theatre leaves something behind with an audience, buried deep within their minds”. With “Proof”, Artefact have produced a deeply relevant, striking and moving piece of theatre that is sure to meet their goals and stay with their audience for a while yet.

The script itself by David Auburn has an incredible amount of appeal, and lends itself effortlessly to Artefact’s core philosophy. Dealing with the themes of family, loss, sacrifice, depression and ultimately survival, Proof’s greatest strength is that it quickly centres in on its characters. The show is quite cathartic in the way some of its themes are unapologetically confronting, but never dealt with in bad taste. Regardless of how serious the show sounds, make no mistake; it is very funny. Director Emily O’Brien-Brown has achieved the perfect balance of comedy and heartbreak to produce something very special indeed. Read more …

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REVIEW: Babirra’s “Mary Poppins”

Mary Poppins is perhaps one of the most iconic, yet simultaneously underrated musicals of our time. The story of a family who, despite appearances, are thoroughly unhappy and the magical nanny who brings them together is one that has touched the hearts of many people all over the world. It is the beauty and warming nature of the Banks’ journey as a family that forms the heart of the production, which Director Chris Bradtke has brought to life in Babirra’s first show of 2016 playing at the Whitehouse Centre this week.

When casting a character whose brief includes being “practically perfect” in every possible way, a number of challenges arise. However daunting the task, Babirra have managed to hit the goldmine with Stephanie John who provided a performance that effortlessly met the expectations set by such an iconic character. For the entirety of the show’s duration, John captured the perfect balance of sternness and charm that is so integral to Poppins’ personality. Vocally, John never showed any sign of fatigue or exhaustion and produced a performance reminiscent of Julie Andrews’ original portrayal. Angelo De Cata’s portrayal of Bert was a standout as well, though did seem a little inconsistent at times. There were a few short moments in the first act where De Cata struggled, however his infectious energy and heightened enthusiasm for the role did well to disguise any difficulties. Read more …

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REVIEW: Burning House’s “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”

Despite always being quite a strong fan of Shakespeare’s work in reading, there have been many moments over the years where I’ve struggled to fully connect to staged interpretations of his work to the same level as I had when reading and studying it privately. “Coriolanus” to me has never been one of Shakespeare’s “greats”, and despite seeing it performed twice in the past, it rarely managed to leave an impression. All these factors considered, it was with an open mind that I attended Burning House’s performance of “The Tragedy of Coriolanus” last week. Without question, what followed was one of the most intimate and rewarding theatre experiences I had ever been a part of.

After months of seeing shows performed in back alleys and hotel rooms (as great as that was), it was slightly refreshing to be back sitting in the rows of a more orthodox audience space, looking down upon a proper stage in an established theatre…however conventional the setting was, Burning House’s usage of it was anything but. Having the cast sitting visibly around the area while they were not on stage is a bold move – but an incredibly original and fascinating one. Somehow, my experience was not impacted, nor my suspension of disbelief ‘shattered’ by the staging – instead it was almost more enchanting then usual; watching the actors sit motionless, go through their costume changes before stepping into the space and becoming their characters so completely. Every aspect of the show and every movement carried out by its actors was incredibly stylized and choreographed, leading to an end result that felt remarkably polished.

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