Category: Events

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PODCAST: RadMon Reacts – 2016 American Election

Now available on Radio Monash; “RadMon Reacts: The 2016 US Election”

Join Vivek Thilkan​, Avanti Oberoi​, Connor Johnston​, Ruari Shackleton​ and Sayu Umeda​ in one of the most passionate, analytical and engaging political podcasts of the year featuring cutdowns of RadMon’s day long coverage of Donald Trump’s victory as it happened live – followed by a feature length roundtable discussion exploring the most contentious topics of the result.

Featured below is both a highlights reel from the show and of course the entire podcast.

Read more …

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HIGHLIGHT: The Great Deja Moo Debate

screen-shot-2016-10-08-at-7-13-18-pmWe’ve seen #HillaryVTrump – but everyone who is anyone knows that the real debate of the week was ConnorVParis in the GREAT DEJA MOO DEBATE. Join us as we channel the same passion and energy one would find in a presidential debate while discussion ridiculously trivial things…. Who’s side are you on?

Deja Moo – Hosted By: Connor Johnston, Paris Balla, Yusuf Aly and Sam Corcoran // 

If you’re looking for fresh, meaningful and funny conversations concerning the politics and pop culture of the day; Deja Moo is the place to go. Ranging from serious, analytical commentary to downright embarrassing banter, Deja Moo covers everything from Parliament to Pop Music. This as diverse as it gets, with genuine bangers, challenges, interviews and reviews all part of an average week. With Connor, Paris and Yusuf, news doesn’t have to be boring. Catch us Monday’s from 6-7pm on Radio Monash or via our Mixcloud page.

Read more …

Ret Blue

Notice: A Compulsory Meeting for Returning Presenters

***Please be aware this notice is only for Semester One Presenters hoping to return to the station in Semester Two — New Presenter Applications will open later in the week**

This is the event for the Compulsory Meeting/Training Session for ALL PRESENTERS HOPING TO RETURN FOR SEMESTER on Friday the 22nd of July at 12:00pm. It is extremely crucial that any presenters hoping to return for the new semester attend.

With Semester 2 fast approaching, we are now offering all Semester One presenters the opportunity to express interest in our new timetable, before show applications open to new presenters next week. Read more …

Wolf

REVIEW: Winterfall’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”

Review written by Saskia Penn and Connor Johnston:

Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” is an iconic piece of 20th Century Americana, often considered one of the greatest scripts in theatrical history. Winterfall Theatre’s current season of the classic play presents a raw, realistic, and compelling interpretation of the complex material and its utter success is owed, in no small part to the miraculous performances presented by the accomplished cast.

The three hour-long study in the dynamics of marriage is strung with an incredible, palpable tension throughout, the claustrophobic atmosphere thick with bourbon. At times highly absurd, at times strangely funny, at times genuinely frightening and at times truly challenging, this post modern giant dances like the wind on the edge between reality and illusion. Through the violent throes of breakdown, the deepest, darkest freudian truths and fantasies of the characters are revealed, allowing the audience a rare opportunity for genuine intellectual stimulation. Read more …

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REVIEW: Babirra’s “Mary Poppins”

Mary Poppins is perhaps one of the most iconic, yet simultaneously underrated musicals of our time. The story of a family who, despite appearances, are thoroughly unhappy and the magical nanny who brings them together is one that has touched the hearts of many people all over the world. It is the beauty and warming nature of the Banks’ journey as a family that forms the heart of the production, which Director Chris Bradtke has brought to life in Babirra’s first show of 2016 playing at the Whitehouse Centre this week.

When casting a character whose brief includes being “practically perfect” in every possible way, a number of challenges arise. However daunting the task, Babirra have managed to hit the goldmine with Stephanie John who provided a performance that effortlessly met the expectations set by such an iconic character. For the entirety of the show’s duration, John captured the perfect balance of sternness and charm that is so integral to Poppins’ personality. Vocally, John never showed any sign of fatigue or exhaustion and produced a performance reminiscent of Julie Andrews’ original portrayal. Angelo De Cata’s portrayal of Bert was a standout as well, though did seem a little inconsistent at times. There were a few short moments in the first act where De Cata struggled, however his infectious energy and heightened enthusiasm for the role did well to disguise any difficulties. Read more …

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REVIEW: Burning House’s “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”

Despite always being quite a strong fan of Shakespeare’s work in reading, there have been many moments over the years where I’ve struggled to fully connect to staged interpretations of his work to the same level as I had when reading and studying it privately. “Coriolanus” to me has never been one of Shakespeare’s “greats”, and despite seeing it performed twice in the past, it rarely managed to leave an impression. All these factors considered, it was with an open mind that I attended Burning House’s performance of “The Tragedy of Coriolanus” last week. Without question, what followed was one of the most intimate and rewarding theatre experiences I had ever been a part of.

After months of seeing shows performed in back alleys and hotel rooms (as great as that was), it was slightly refreshing to be back sitting in the rows of a more orthodox audience space, looking down upon a proper stage in an established theatre…however conventional the setting was, Burning House’s usage of it was anything but. Having the cast sitting visibly around the area while they were not on stage is a bold move – but an incredibly original and fascinating one. Somehow, my experience was not impacted, nor my suspension of disbelief ‘shattered’ by the staging – instead it was almost more enchanting then usual; watching the actors sit motionless, go through their costume changes before stepping into the space and becoming their characters so completely. Every aspect of the show and every movement carried out by its actors was incredibly stylized and choreographed, leading to an end result that felt remarkably polished.

Read more …

Piece performed by Many Moons Productions at the 3rd Commemoration

THEATRE EVENT: Someone Has To Pay For It

A verbatim theatre piece performed Sunday the 24th April provided a striking snapshot into the tragedy of those involved in Bangladesh’s Rana Plaza Collapse three years ago.

The Rana Plaza Collapse on the 24th of April 2013, caused by the negligence of officials and lack of proper conditions for workers creating ‘fast fashion’, killed thousands and left many more injured. The third commemoration of the collapse involved a piece of street theatre depicting the stories of those involved in the collapse. I spoke to those involved with the production and performance of this piece. Read more …

Women In Media – where is the future heading?

Sending the Twitter trail blazing, the Victorian launch night of Women In Media attracted big names and established speakers alike to a Lonsdale Street venue on Thursday night.

Television pioneer and well respected radio host, Caroline Jones, spoke regarding the issues facing women in media, from breaking the gender mould to the struggles faced by regional reporters. Her position as one of Australia’s living treasures was reaffirmed, with the likes of Emily Angwin and Jessica Tracned commenting positively upon the wisdom and frank discussion promoted through Jones’ talk.

The Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA) has established Women In Media (WIM) as a mentoring and networking initiative to encourage female empowerment in an industry that has historically been saturated with sexism and subversive objectification of women. With figureheads in every state as mentors for younger journalists and reporters to network with, a strong and vibrant community is being established in previously unexplored fields.

Food columnist Alice Zaslavksy proclaimed the event as a night of ‘#WIMMING” – and indeed it was. With sold out tickets and a concrete union movement set in motion through the initiative, pivotal issues were brought to the table in the public domain. Issues that were published on the MEAA blog, such as the pay gap, parental leave, harassment, and discrimination, were debated and challenged.

The night allowed for the beginning of a movement to conceive change in the entertainment industry, and more rapid development and momentum is expected to gather in future to break stereotypes and change media dynamics. As hoped by Marcia Langton, here’s to the “world changing quicker”.

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Radio Monash Presents: KARAOKE NIGHT

Come sing the night away with us at Charltons Entertainment Complex
2/2 Coverlid Place, Melbourne, 3000
Short walk from Melbourne Central and behind 170 Russell

Friday 29th April

 

Get those vocal chords and best rock star impersonations ready for the first big Radio Monash event of 2016 ….

That’s right, we are having a KARAOKE NIGHT!

If you would like to come to this event, all you have to do is message the Radio Monash Facebook page and send us your full name so we can add you to our guestlist. Names have to be given to us by 6.00pm on Thursday 28th April.

You definitely don’t want to miss what is going to be an absolutely hilarious fun night with your mates at Radio Monash!

 

FACEBOOK EVENT

“death tax” on the cards while private companies earning over $200 million pay none

With the release of the budget by the Coalition just over a month away, possible inclusion of the controversial policy of collecting student debts from the dead, as well as increasing student fees could find themselves to be on the table in an attempt to achieve savings.

Currently HECS debts of deceased estates worth more than $100,000 are written off by the government, recognising that these sums will never be recovered. If however such policy was to be implemented, it would lead to a potential $800 million in savings. This is something Education Minister Simon Birmnigham would very much welcome, due to the pressure the education sector is under to produce some substantial savings.

Although other options are under consideration to gather funds, a positive in recovering HECS debt from deceased individuals is that it would be mostly affecting wealthy households, ensuring that low-income graduates would not be affected due to the $100,000 basis.

While such a policy would see a small contribution to the deficit in the short-term, it would highly impact on the debt that the government still had outstanding in the long-term, meaning that future budgets and economic activity would benefit.

Additionally there is still the matter of a 20% cut in funding and increasing student fees without full deregulation of the system, options that still remain official government policy, and will apply with other reforms the government decide to adopt.

Such savings are important for the government in order for the budget to eventually come back into surplus, and furthermore to provide resources to fund other projects it has set on it’s agenda. What goes against such a death tax and its need to create savings is the fact that almost a third of large private companies paid no tax in the 2013-14 period. These figures would immediately make one believe that such companies were dodging their obligations, yet the fact that such companies are associated with a variety of entities, means that the aggregate of these private groups could result in no profit, or losses in previous years which are offset, and therefore no tax.

 

Oxfam Australia’s Joy Kyriacou said upon this instalment that “it’s time for the Australian Government to crack down on large companies…. [they] should justify their investments in tax havens, and be required to publicly report the taxes they pay- both in Australia and overseas.”

Such insight would clarify and ensure that companies operating in Australia are paying their fair share of tax, but then the question arises of where do we draw the line in terms of information that companies should report? AASB standards reflect the requirements and important information users need to make informed decisions. What is clear is that users will never be completely informed of everything going on in relation to a company, and publicly reporting taxes paid in various countries may not be of extensive use to such a point as to make it a requirement. But would it assist in getting rid of unfair tax breaks? Possibly, a matter that ultimately would need to be debated by the government and accountants in the industry.

What is imminently clear though is that voters will not warm highly to the idea of a ‘death tax’ where tax isn’t being contributed by large private companies operating in Australia. Tightening tax laws just might have to occur in order for other elements proposed by the government in their looming budget to be accepted by the Australian voters.