Category: Featured

CPSN

PODCASTS: “CP FACTS 2017” – A Series by The Cerebral Palsy Support Network

The Cerebral Palsy Support Network (CPSN) is a not-for-profit organisation providing information and support services to people living with Cerebral Palsy and their families. They help empower individuals to lead more independent lives and provide support in a variety of ways to their families.

Together with the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, CPSN presented CP FACTS – a half-day event designed to provide credible information related to cerebral palsy through a number of presentations, seminars, exhibitions and stands on the 18th of March 2017. Read more …

Thinkergirls

SPECIAL PODCAST: Morning Glory and The Thinkergirls – Live from KIIS FM

RECORDED LIVE IN SYDNEY’S KIIS FM STUDIOS – MORNING GLORY MEETS THE THINKERGIRLS

Join Morning Glory’s Shelbui Inglis and Connor Johnston live from KIIS FM studios in Sydney with the Thinkergirls themselves: Stacy June and Kristy Mercer. Discussion points include everything from the Gender Politics of Presenting Radio, On-Air Dynamics, Hickeys, Oral Sex, Kissing Techniques and so much more.

We’re talking the thoughts you’re thinking – but not saying – in this Radio Monash Special Event

Read more …

HAM

I’m Not Satisfied! The Problem With Hamilton: An American Musical

Hamilton: An American Musical is an unquestionable modern phenomenon. It has supplanted Chicago, Wicked, and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat as my favourite musical of all time. It’s a rap-based musical almost any naysayers of the genre in general should at least be able to stomach, its music is incredible, its lyrics succinctly poignant, its emotions conveyed brilliantly with the fervour that one can’t help but associate with Yanks in general (Yanks very much being the correct term for this crop of historical figures, given their status as New York natives).

But I’m calling bullshit on the romantic plot lines of this musical. Read more …

radmin3

Women Creatives Are Constantly Undermined – And Here’s What I’m Doing to Stop That

For those of you who don’t know, Radio Monash had a woman elected to the role of president for the first time in a long while at the end of last year. That woman? Me; Aleks. Third year Immunology student. Pleasure to make your acquaintance.

If you know me personally, you’d be very aware at the fact that I’m goal and task oriented. You got a problem? Let’s work out how we can fix it. What’s in my control? What cannot be avoided? What can I start on immediately to work away at the issue? Along with avoiding micro-management at all costs, my other long-term goal for the year is to ensure that Radio Monash grows and flourishes as a space for all creatives. Read more …

Methyl Ethel

GIG REVIEW: Methyl Ethel at the Howler (Thursday, February 23rd)

Perth natives Methyl Ethel recently exploded with popularity as their 2016 debut album “Oh Inhuman Spectacle” propelled them into fame, producing triple J favourites such as “Rogues”, and the ninety-seventh place in the Hottest-100-of-2015 tune, “Twilight Driving”. After being signed to 4AD records amongst the ranks of Future Islands, and Purity Ring and completing a US tour, the band returned to their home soil to promote and reveal previously unheard songs to be featured on their follow-up album “Everything Is Forgotten” for a show at Brunswick’s The Howler. Supported by similarly dream-pop bands, Quivers and Totally Mild, the night was sure to be a laid-back evening of unique art-pop. Read more …

Slide7

FILM REVIEW: Live By Night

In a landscape where every second film released continues, sets up or reboots a franchise – there is something oddly refreshing about a movie that requires no prior knowledge or investment outside of the two hours of viewing. Ben Affleck’s newest feature, Live by Night, is the epitome of a standalone crime thriller, with rich imagery and an incredibly capable cast. However, in remaining coy and uncertain about how to handle its ties to the historical conflicts of the prohibition era, Live by Night risks detaching itself from achieving anything of real substance. Read more …

moonlih

FILM REVIEW: Moonlight

Moonlight is the black man’s Brokeback Mountain; less contrived, more intimate and powerfully thought-provoking. For too long has the queer narrative focussed on white voices, whether it be the aforementioned box office success or Blue is the Warmest Colour. Moonlight does justice to the complexities of the battle and struggles faced by millions of men of colour around the world in the clash of perceptions between queerness and hyper-masculinity. It details the coming of age tale of Chiron, a young and relatively poor black boy raised in Miami, a turned hardened man, coming to terms with his sexual identity in a world that expects him to reject seemingly feminine desires. Read more …

fffff

GIG REVIEW: Camp Cope with Alex Lahey and RVG @ The Old Bar

Recently, the Melbourne music scene has seen an outrageously productive surge in brilliant, unique talent. Venues within the city’s varying suburbs have inspired and have encouraged many world-renowned acts such as Crowded House, Hunters & Collectors, The Avalanches and The Cat Empire. In more recent time and even within 2016, a handful of talented Melbournian bands emerged onto the scene bringing with them inventive new ways to hear and look at music. Alex Lahey and Camp Cope are no exception to this. Both bands have a refreshing and energetic sound on record, and their live sound is another thing altogether. The two female-fronted bands banded together last Sunday on the 16th of January at the Old Bar returning to where their stardom began.

Read more …

cb2

FILM REVIEW: Collateral Beauty

Every once in a while a film comes along that urges you to totally re-evaluate everything you think you know about cinema. Will Smith’s newest blockbuster Collateral Beauty follows the grieving process of Smith’s character ‘Howard’, how he deals with the death of his daughter and how his reaction impacts the lives of people around him.  A simple enough synopsis and an incredibly impressive line-up of supporting A-List actors… what could possibly go wrong?

Everything. Everything goes wrong. Read more …

Jackie

ADVANCE REVIEW: JACKIE

The genre of biography pictures has many differing sub-genres and styles. A film reviewed last week, The Founder, lies somewhere within the “based on a true story” genre, where the ‘story’ told spans several years. Films like this include The Blind Side, Precious or The Social Network, which tell stories lasting many years. Another sub-genre within this genre is the ‘based on a true event’ genre, which chronicles the key moments within a single event. These kinds of films are dedicated much more to informing the audience of a certain event, especially an event that requires explanation, or perhaps, was never properly exposed in the first place. Patriot’s Day and Captain Philips are two other films within this genre that concentrated on one specific event, the former, the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing, and the latter, a pirate raid of a boat. Similar to this, Jackie is a film that intensely focuses on the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated and the chaotic week that followed.

Read more …

arrival

FILM REVIEW: Arrival

One of the most loved and frequented film genres of our time is science fiction. This is the genre that allows us to knowingly venture into the unknown and contemplate circumstances beyond the capacity of our own beliefs. The idea of ‘extra terrestrials’, more commonly known as ‘aliens’ existing, let alone having the capacity to inhabit earth racks the minds of many sceptics. Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival is a film that although slightly lacking in ingenuity, provides the audience with a pensive and thought provoking experience. Read more …

edge

ADVANCE REVIEW: The Edge of Seventeen

Please Note: Radio Monash’s pre-release reviews aim to be as detail-free as they reasonably can while still offering a critique, but as everyone’s spoiler sensibilities are different, we advise you read on at your own discretion.

Coming of age films can only really go one of two ways. They either crash and burn, suffocated to death under a bed of never ending clichés; or they actually succeed with audiences, by not patronising them, and are created by people (as opposed to robots) who actually remember what it was like to grow up; to fall in and out of love, to obsess about every aspect of one’s appearance and personality, and above all, to make mistakes. Without question, The Edge of Seventeen falls into the second group of films with Roadshow producing one of the most refreshingly realistic and relatable studies into the teenage psyche that we’ve seen on the big screen in years. Read more …