Category: Reviews

FTAWTFT

Fantastic Tips and Where To Find Them “O-Show” Review

O-Week, or Orientation Week, has finally arrived and feelings of anxiety, nervousness and apprehension are certainly brimming in most of students’ minds. These sentiments are shared between first year students, and returning students as some are experiencing the University for the first time or the last time. Thankfully, the MUST (Monash University Student Theatre) company have developed a unique and succinct method of easing everyone’s woe in their hilariously educational “O-Show”, Fantastic Tips and Where To Find Them. Read more …

radmon

Gabriella Cohen at NGV’s Summer Sundays 5/2/2017

If you constantly find yourself on a budget and bored on a Sunday afternoon, say no more, the National Gallery of Victoria has your back and have curated an epic summer line up of wonderful Melbourne musicians to keep your musical tastebuds satisfied. These events invite people of all ages, to come and hang out in the NGV’s luscious backyard and see some of Melbourne’s upcoming bands and DJ’s perform under the mesmerising stained glass roof of the gallery, whilst also being able to check out some cool art, entirely for free. To kick off this summer series, the lovely Gabriella Cohen took to the stage to enchant her audience with her playful and energetic set. Read more …

Slide7

FILM REVIEW: Live By Night

In a landscape where every second film released continues, sets up or reboots a franchise – there is something oddly refreshing about a movie that requires no prior knowledge or investment outside of the two hours of viewing. Ben Affleck’s newest feature, Live by Night, is the epitome of a standalone crime thriller, with rich imagery and an incredibly capable cast. However, in remaining coy and uncertain about how to handle its ties to the historical conflicts of the prohibition era, Live by Night risks detaching itself from achieving anything of real substance. Read more …

moonlih

FILM REVIEW: Moonlight

Moonlight is the black man’s Brokeback Mountain; less contrived, more intimate and powerfully thought-provoking. For too long has the queer narrative focussed on white voices, whether it be the aforementioned box office success or Blue is the Warmest Colour. Moonlight does justice to the complexities of the battle and struggles faced by millions of men of colour around the world in the clash of perceptions between queerness and hyper-masculinity. It details the coming of age tale of Chiron, a young and relatively poor black boy raised in Miami, a turned hardened man, coming to terms with his sexual identity in a world that expects him to reject seemingly feminine desires. Read more …

fffff

GIG REVIEW: Camp Cope with Alex Lahey and RVG @ The Old Bar

Recently, the Melbourne music scene has seen an outrageously productive surge in brilliant, unique talent. Venues within the city’s varying suburbs have inspired and have encouraged many world-renowned acts such as Crowded House, Hunters & Collectors, The Avalanches and The Cat Empire. In more recent time and even within 2016, a handful of talented Melbournian bands emerged onto the scene bringing with them inventive new ways to hear and look at music. Alex Lahey and Camp Cope are no exception to this. Both bands have a refreshing and energetic sound on record, and their live sound is another thing altogether. The two female-fronted bands banded together last Sunday on the 16th of January at the Old Bar returning to where their stardom began.

Read more …

cb2

FILM REVIEW: Collateral Beauty

Every once in a while a film comes along that urges you to totally re-evaluate everything you think you know about cinema. Will Smith’s newest blockbuster Collateral Beauty follows the grieving process of Smith’s character ‘Howard’, how he deals with the death of his daughter and how his reaction impacts the lives of people around him.  A simple enough synopsis and an incredibly impressive line-up of supporting A-List actors… what could possibly go wrong?

Everything. Everything goes wrong. Read more …

Jackie

ADVANCE REVIEW: JACKIE

The genre of biography pictures has many differing sub-genres and styles. A film reviewed last week, The Founder, lies somewhere within the “based on a true story” genre, where the ‘story’ told spans several years. Films like this include The Blind Side, Precious or The Social Network, which tell stories lasting many years. Another sub-genre within this genre is the ‘based on a true event’ genre, which chronicles the key moments within a single event. These kinds of films are dedicated much more to informing the audience of a certain event, especially an event that requires explanation, or perhaps, was never properly exposed in the first place. Patriot’s Day and Captain Philips are two other films within this genre that concentrated on one specific event, the former, the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing, and the latter, a pirate raid of a boat. Similar to this, Jackie is a film that intensely focuses on the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated and the chaotic week that followed.

Read more …

arrival

FILM REVIEW: Arrival

One of the most loved and frequented film genres of our time is science fiction. This is the genre that allows us to knowingly venture into the unknown and contemplate circumstances beyond the capacity of our own beliefs. The idea of ‘extra terrestrials’, more commonly known as ‘aliens’ existing, let alone having the capacity to inhabit earth racks the minds of many sceptics. Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival is a film that although slightly lacking in ingenuity, provides the audience with a pensive and thought provoking experience. Read more …

rdtb

REVIEW: Red Dog True Blue

When thinking of Australian movies, works such as The Adventures of Priscilla Queen of the Desert, The Castle and Australia would all be appropriate examples. From my perspective as a non-Australian reviewer, these films have included a certain sincerity compared to their Hollywood counterparts being more artistic, culturally relevant and at times even educational. Read more …

founder

MOVIE REVIEW: The Founder

The use of “true events” in film has been a part of the medium ever since its creation in the 19th Century. Early movies retold authentic tales of “heroic” bushrangers, stories of mutinying Russian revolutionaries and dramatizations of a long forgotten military ambush. Of course, as technology advanced and audience’s interests altered, retellings slowly changed to adaptations with configurations. A “based upon true events”, with an emphasis on based, movie is a fantastic way to reflect upon a national tragedy or even reveal a once untold story through the magic of cinema. An important part of this type of film is its educational potential. One could learn about a certain event by reading a monotonously long history book, or they could pursue an iconic figure by studying newspaper articles or researching the depths of the internet, or they could digest this information in a fast, and simple to comprehend movie. Ironically enough, “biography pictures” or biopics are sort of the junk food of historical reflection and enlightenment. It’s quick, palatable; it’s even portable now, and lacks, perhaps, the finesse or the detail of a textbook. In our time, “based on true events” biopics have upsurged in popularity since 1899, and have dominated the past 2 decades’ “Best Film” OSCARS. With recent releases honouring Boston Globe journalists, a person discovering their transgender identity and Martin Luther King, pioneer biopic director, John Lee Hancock decided to investigate the peculiar origins of worldwide fast food franchise ‘McDonald’s’ in his latest film: The Founder. Read more …

edge

ADVANCE REVIEW: The Edge of Seventeen

Please Note: Radio Monash’s pre-release reviews aim to be as detail-free as they reasonably can while still offering a critique, but as everyone’s spoiler sensibilities are different, we advise you read on at your own discretion.

Coming of age films can only really go one of two ways. They either crash and burn, suffocated to death under a bed of never ending clichés; or they actually succeed with audiences, by not patronising them, and are created by people (as opposed to robots) who actually remember what it was like to grow up; to fall in and out of love, to obsess about every aspect of one’s appearance and personality, and above all, to make mistakes. Without question, The Edge of Seventeen falls into the second group of films with Roadshow producing one of the most refreshingly realistic and relatable studies into the teenage psyche that we’ve seen on the big screen in years. Read more …

pass

FILM REVIEW: Passengers

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away; science fiction movies were only ever made for, valued by and in many cases understood by those who existed within a certain niche. The comic book collector who had more conversations with a limited edition’ Sexy Wookie Deluxe Doll than a living human person – you understand the stereotype. Roadshow’s newest blockbuster Passengers, released on Sunday, stands to prove how far the genre has subverted itself in recent years. With a script designed to be understood and appreciated at face value, visuals that advertise its own luxurious budget and two of the most iconic and successful actors of our time at its front: Passengers proves how mainstream and different movies rooted in the world of science fiction have become. Read more …