Category: Reviews

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FILM REVIEW: Arrival

One of the most loved and frequented film genres of our time is science fiction. This is the genre that allows us to knowingly venture into the unknown and contemplate circumstances beyond the capacity of our own beliefs. The idea of ‘extra terrestrials’, more commonly known as ‘aliens’ existing, let alone having the capacity to inhabit earth racks the minds of many sceptics. Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival is a film that although slightly lacking in ingenuity, provides the audience with a pensive and thought provoking experience. Read more …

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REVIEW: Red Dog True Blue

When thinking of Australian movies, works such as The Adventures of Priscilla Queen of the Desert, The Castle and Australia would all be appropriate examples. From my perspective as a non-Australian reviewer, these films have included a certain sincerity compared to their Hollywood counterparts being more artistic, culturally relevant and at times even educational. Read more …

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MOVIE REVIEW: The Founder

The use of “true events” in film has been a part of the medium ever since its creation in the 19th Century. Early movies retold authentic tales of “heroic” bushrangers, stories of mutinying Russian revolutionaries and dramatizations of a long forgotten military ambush. Of course, as technology advanced and audience’s interests altered, retellings slowly changed to adaptations with configurations. A “based upon true events”, with an emphasis on based, movie is a fantastic way to reflect upon a national tragedy or even reveal a once untold story through the magic of cinema. An important part of this type of film is its educational potential. One could learn about a certain event by reading a monotonously long history book, or they could pursue an iconic figure by studying newspaper articles or researching the depths of the internet, or they could digest this information in a fast, and simple to comprehend movie. Ironically enough, “biography pictures” or biopics are sort of the junk food of historical reflection and enlightenment. It’s quick, palatable; it’s even portable now, and lacks, perhaps, the finesse or the detail of a textbook. In our time, “based on true events” biopics have upsurged in popularity since 1899, and have dominated the past 2 decades’ “Best Film” OSCARS. With recent releases honouring Boston Globe journalists, a person discovering their transgender identity and Martin Luther King, pioneer biopic director, John Lee Hancock decided to investigate the peculiar origins of worldwide fast food franchise ‘McDonald’s’ in his latest film: The Founder. Read more …

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ADVANCE REVIEW: The Edge of Seventeen

Please Note: Radio Monash’s pre-release reviews aim to be as detail-free as they reasonably can while still offering a critique, but as everyone’s spoiler sensibilities are different, we advise you read on at your own discretion.

Coming of age films can only really go one of two ways. They either crash and burn, suffocated to death under a bed of never ending clichés; or they actually succeed with audiences, by not patronising them, and are created by people (as opposed to robots) who actually remember what it was like to grow up; to fall in and out of love, to obsess about every aspect of one’s appearance and personality, and above all, to make mistakes. Without question, The Edge of Seventeen falls into the second group of films with Roadshow producing one of the most refreshingly realistic and relatable studies into the teenage psyche that we’ve seen on the big screen in years. Read more …

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FILM REVIEW: Passengers

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away; science fiction movies were only ever made for, valued by and in many cases understood by those who existed within a certain niche. The comic book collector who had more conversations with a limited edition’ Sexy Wookie Deluxe Doll than a living human person – you understand the stereotype. Roadshow’s newest blockbuster Passengers, released on Sunday, stands to prove how far the genre has subverted itself in recent years. With a script designed to be understood and appreciated at face value, visuals that advertise its own luxurious budget and two of the most iconic and successful actors of our time at its front: Passengers proves how mainstream and different movies rooted in the world of science fiction have become. Read more …

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ALBUM REVIEW: Birds of Tokyo’s “Brace”

Following Birds of Tokyo’s channel ten sports-montage-anthem ‘Lanterns’, to say the band had fully embraced pop-rock success would have been a fair assessment. Rarely does a band make a record like ‘March Fires’ and then emerge two years later with something entirely different. During the ‘Lanterns’ era, many would not have guessed the next Birds of Tokyo album would be hell-bent on channelling anger, disillusionment and general vitriol at the state of the modern world. Read more …

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FILM REVIEW: La La Land

Musicals, especially stage musicals, have become incredibly popular in the past few decades. Hamilton made learning history “cool” again by modernising it musically; Wicked revealed the story behind the Wizard of Oz through emotional, storytelling ballads and Spiderman the Musical…happened. The silver screen was also once honoured with the presence of wonderfully catchy and timeless musicals such as West Side Story, Singin’ in the Rain and The Sound of Music. Recent entries into this genre haven’t been necessarily awful but they haven’t been entirely original either, and although Into the Woods and Jersey Boys were fantastic, the former was once a novel and the latter was adapted from its stage counterpart. The refreshing and refined insanity of early comedy-musicals is absent from our modern movie musicals. It is clear that it is Director Damien Chazelle’s divine right to inoculate musical nonsense and magic back into film as La La Land, his third feature film, is the perfect, nostalgic template for what a musical movie should be. Read more …

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RadMon Recommends: Please Like Me

Situational Comedies, or as they are more commonly known, “Sit-Coms”, have been through interesting phases of development since I Love Lucy graced people’s tiny black and white boxes in the 1950s. In the 66 or so years that sit-coms have been popular, shows within this genre have been fake documentaries, candid peeks into “real” family lives and tales of “nerds” trying to exist in the real world. And although these shows attempted to represent “situations” between a family or a group of friends, no other modern show comes even close to being as realistically situational as Josh Thomas’ Comedy, Please Like Me. Read more …

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Funking Dam! k-Lab debuts ‘Worlds’ EP

The word funk gets thrown around as inappropriately as alcohol at a sixteenth birthday party. You think over-consumption is cool at the time, but slowly you grow up and mature, take responsibility and eventually learn to walk the walk. With “Worlds”, K-lab is definitely walking the walk.

Groove oozes all over this record. Hip Hop sythphonic out of space trip, with plenty of variety featuring drum and bass, dubstep and punchy beat stabs you’ll find on track’s like ‘Don’t lose yourself.’ Yet with all the electronic influence, reminiscent of the 80s, combined with classic, palm muted guitar licks still maintain serious soul, a core ingredient to the funk. Read more …

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ANNOUNCEMENT: Radio Monash to attend the 2016 AACTA Awards in Sydney

Radio Monash are thrilled to announce that it will be sending four presenters to attend the 2016 Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards in Sydney next week. Covering the event live from the Red Carpet on Wednesday the 7th of December, our presenters will be face to face with some of the most iconic and celebrated personalities of the Australian Film and TV Industry. Radio Monash is the first community owned and student-run media organisation to be invited to the event in the history of awards, which is an achievement we are both incredibly humbled and excited by. Read more …

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PODCAST: RadMon Reacts – 2016 American Election

Now available on Radio Monash; “RadMon Reacts: The 2016 US Election”

Join Vivek Thilkan​, Avanti Oberoi​, Connor Johnston​, Ruari Shackleton​ and Sayu Umeda​ in one of the most passionate, analytical and engaging political podcasts of the year featuring cutdowns of RadMon’s day long coverage of Donald Trump’s victory as it happened live – followed by a feature length roundtable discussion exploring the most contentious topics of the result.

Featured below is both a highlights reel from the show and of course the entire podcast.

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GIG REVIEW: Tribute Band Night at Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy: The New Fellas and The Smokes

Ever since the Buggs and Elvis impersonators became popular, tribute bands have always been a staple in music entertainment. Tribute cover bands serve as a great way for bands who are perhaps getting too old to perform, or the more morbid side of it, for bands whose members are no longer with us, to be injected, to avoid a pun here, with more life. Unlike cheese, bands do not get riper with age but tribute bands are sort of a way to pick a rotting cheese off the shelf and repackaging it and calling it “blue cheese” and “decadent”. Many would argue the Strokes aren’t getting worse with age, despite being in the game for over a decade now, and people who’ve listened to their most recent Future, Present, Past EP would agree they are losing their touch a bit. But the Strokes are well into middle age now and have lost touch with their 2001, Is This It selves. The band no longer play dingy, and smoky, packed venues, nor do they indulge in on-stage antics with intense audience participation, tossing microphone stands like javelins. Luckily enough for us, The Smokes, pulled us into a time machine, said “where we’re going, we don’t need synthesisers!”, and took us back to a time around 2006 where The Strokes were in full swing and were filled with youth and energy.

Read more …