Category: Reviews

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“A Soldier’s Wife” by Pamela Hart – A Story of Love and War.

Pamela Hart is an award-winning author for both adults and children. She has a Doctorate of Creative Arts from the University of Technology, Sydney, where she has also lectured in creative writing. Writing under the name Pamela Freeman, she wrote the historical novel The Black Dress, which won the NSW Premier’s History Prize for 2006 and is now in its third edition. Pamela is also well known for her fantasy novels for adults published by Orbit worldwide, the Castings Trilogy and her Aurealis Award-winning novel, Ember and Ash. Pamela lives in Sydney with her husband and their son, and teaches at the Australian Writers’ Centre. The Soldier’s Wife is her 30th book.

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SAFIA – Internal (Album Review)

SAFIA.

The name has been prominent in Australia’s independent electronic music scene for a while now, and from the moment they released their first single Listen to Soul, Listen to Blues in 2013, it has been well and truly evident that these guys are nothing like any other band out there. Characterised by strong beats, pulsing synths, catchy riffs and melodies, and vocalist Ben Woolner’s unique soul-tinged voice – at times powerful, at times light and husky, with a vocal range that jumps around between tenor to falsetto with seeming ease.

Despite having only released five singles prior to this year, three of these five have made Triple J Hottest 100 countdowns and the band has had no trouble selling out headline shows across the country and flooring crowds at music festivals such as Groovin’ the Moo.

It goes without saying then that the anticipation for an album has been around for a very, very long time; well before making one was even alluded to, yet alone actually announced. However, the excruciatingly long wait is finally over with today’s release of their long-awaited masterpiece: Internal. Read more …

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Felix Riebl – “Paper Doors” Review

I’ve been a Cat Empire fan since their hit ‘Hello’, and have loved their distinctive Australian take on ska and jazz. The Cat Empire have toured the world countless times, and their music is loved internationally for the band’s stupendous brass lines, keyboard finesse and thrifty use of vinyl scratching. Front-man Felix Riebl has been the mastermind behind the majority of the band’s success, with his charismatic performance style and intelligent song-writing.

 

But, following on from the band’s successful 2016 album Rising with the Sun, Felix has decided to go solo once more and release a second album. Paper Doors, released 2nd September 2016, may be short (totalling only 37 minutes), but certainly has a great variety of content. With guest artists including the likes of Emily Lubitz, Katy Steele and Martha Wainwright, it is certainly nice to hear a more intimate canvas for Felix to sing with.

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An open letter to Network 10

Why I believe they should either be taxed more, or engage much more in CSR, if they intend to profit off this season of the Bachelor.

 

Dear Network 10 management,

 

On episode 10 of the Bachelor, I watched as Richie and Alex had a single date based around the idea of ‘chocolate’. Now, for once, I shan’t make it a priority to critique the date or the women or the outfits as per usual. Today, my issue is that of the abuse of chocolate propagated by this bachelor Richie Strahan, by the ditz of a date of his, Alex, and by the colossally lousy asshats producing this show.

 

Why am I calling them lousy asshats today? Because they let this pair of morons waste hundreds of millilitres of chocolate on ‘cutesiness’ and a chocolate bath.

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Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani Review (Translates to “This Youth is Crazy”, abbreviated as YJHD).

*****SPOILERS AHEAD*****

The story starts off with a flashback of Naina Talwar (Deepika Padukone) when she is reminiscing about her days in high school and remembering her friends.  An encounter with an old classmate, Aditi Mehra (Kalki Koechlin), makes her realise that she wants more from life than high marks. Thus, she makes an impulsive decision to go on a trip to Manali in Kashmir with her friend Aditi after leaving a letter for her mother.

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THEATRE REVIEW: Beaumaris Theatre’s “Avenue Q”

Remarkably unprepared I walked into the Beaumaris Theatre having not so much as googled the synopsis of “Avenue Q”. Billed as a twisted version of Sesame Street for adults, the show takes place in a street of the same name in which puppets, monsters and humans live together in harmony, more or less. Our central character Princeton, played by the incredible Josh Pratt, arrives on the street having recently completed his BA in English and at a point of cross-roads in his life unsure of where his life will take him. “Avenue Q” explores the life of your typical 20-something graduate entering the real world, a first look at real adulthood, navigating love, money and finding a purpose in life. The musical teaches us that sometimes life sucks, through plenty of painfully relatable misfortunes presented as humorous musical acts, puppetry and a hilarious script. Read more …

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The End of the Decline for DC?

DC Comics has published the most iconic superhero characters for almost a decade, but has an erratic track record at transferring those characters to the big screen as feature films. For the past decade DC movies have struggled against fan reprobation and rapid drop-off in ticket sales. An impartial review of the changes in the DC movies over this period indicates the blame lays squarely on Heath Ledger… or, more accurately, on studio execs completely misinterpreting the cause of a particular movie’s success.

DC/Warner Bros were already looking to change the tone when they rebooted their universe. For those who came in late, movie series based on DC characters tended to start strong and then get progressively weaker as the studios tried to cash in on the hype of the previous movies rather than craft something great. Read more …

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Harry Potter & the Cursed Child review

Some spoilers ahead – each with individual warnings, chill

 

Three weeks ago on Friday I practically skipped into Dymocks to grab my copy of the new Harry Potter book, the eighth, an addendum to a series I have adored from my childhood, and will likely continue to love throughout my adulthood and long past the time old age will make me both wrinkly and potty.

I got home, and in the manner of Hermione Granger buried my nose in the book, barely looking up so that I could finish it as quickly as conceivably possible.

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The Intern Review.

The classic movie starring Robert De Niro as Ben Whittaker, Anne Hathaway as Jules Ostin Rene Russo as Fiona and Anders Holm as Matt is about the challenges for different people in a workplace. Jules Ostin is the owner of a company called “About the Fit”. The online clothing store went from a start-up founded in her kitchen to a 220-employee juggernaut in only eighteen months. Jules’ friend Cameron (Andrew Rannells) puts up a local ad that hires senior interns to work for the company. Ben, who is seventy and a widower, had a hole to fill in his life that couldn’t be filled by anything else other than a decent job. Ben later gets an interview and is assigned to work with Jules, who is somewhat skeptical at first. Initially frozen out by her, Ben slowly wins over co-workers with his likeability and gets into Jules’s good graces. Ben heads to work early one day to unclutter the messy desk in the office which Jules was frustrated by. After work, Ben notices Jules’ chauffeur drinking, convinces the driver to leave and drives Jules home himself, a role he retains in days to come.

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