Category: Reviews

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Violet Femmes : Debut Album Review

-Violent Femmes-  is the debut album by the folk-punk band Violent Femmes. It was recorded in July 1982 and released by Slash Records on vinyl and cassette in April 1983 and on CD in 1987 with the two additional tracks Ugly and Gimme the Car. The band consisted of Gordon Gano (Singer/Guitarist), Brian Ritchie (Bassist) and Victor DeLorenzo (Percussionist).  The album recently achieved a gold certification without even making the charts. In 2002, Rhino Records remade the album for its 20th anniversary with an additional disc of demos and linear notes by Michael Azerrad. Read more …

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Train to Busan: No Ordinary Zombie Movie

An estranged father and daughter find themselves caught in the midst of a zombie outbreak on a high speed train in South Korean horror film Train to Busan.

Recently divorced Seok-woo (Gong Yoo) is taking his daughter Su-an (Kim Su-an) from Seoul to his ex-wife’s house in Busan. At the same time, a zombie virus spreads rapidly across the country and Seok-woo must keep his daughter safe from the zombified passengers on board until they reach Busan, supposedly the last city standing. Read more …

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Review: Aussie Indie Comics Scene

These days comic books are all the rage, mostly through blockbuster movies based on superheroes, with the occasional Alan Moore adaption thrown into the mix. TV has also seen some great adaptations beyond children’s cartoons, again mainly focusing on mainstream superheroes. These often include great stories, but they are limited in their need to appeal to a mass global audience, and their creation by a small number of people in the restriction of a few companies.

There is far more to the comics genre than that, of course. The big publishing companies have their odd-ball imprints, such as Vertigo. Independent publishes release some fantastic stuff that isn’t deemed commercial enough to be put out by the bigger guys – or offer better terms to the creators. Then we get right down to the truly indie stuff, the self-published comics that, traditionally, have a distribution area that lies within public transport distance of the creators. Read more …

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Snarky Puppy Blows the Roof Off The Forum

If you have seen my earlier reviews, you will know that I am a massive fan of US jazz fusion supergroup Snarky Puppy. Too many times in previous years have I seen them headline the Melbourne International Jazz Festival or tour their latest album, and been unable to attend due to my age. But this year, I vowed to see them, at last an adult. Within a minute of receiving the email that Snarky Puppy had announced a new concert in Melbourne, I had the ticket booking page bookmarked to my laptop, and the opening time for tickets added to my phone’s calendar. I was not going to miss out this time!

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Track Review: Free Lunch by Isaiah Rashad

Since its initial slew of studio album releases in 2011, there’s no doubt that Top Dawg Entertainment (TDE) has established itself as one of the most formidable collectives in hip-hop today. The label, founded by current CEO Anthony ‘Top Dawg’ Griffith, boasts a roster as innovative as it is eclectic, featuring the likes of Schoolboy Q, Jay Rock, Ab-Soul and of course multi-Grammy award winner, Kendrick Lamar. The crew extends far deeper than the aforementioned Black Hippy clique however, with Chicago artist Lance Skiiiwalker joining fellow TDE signees SZA and Isaiah Rashad in the ranks this year.

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HEAD TO HEAD REVIEW: Suicide Squad

Over the course of two feature length reviews, Connor Johnston and Mike Riviere will be going head to head and sharing their own views on one of the most anticipated and divisive films of 2016: Suicide Squad

You can read Connor’s Review here:

http://radiomonash.net/2016/08/04/head-to-head-review-suicide-squad-connors-verdict/

Extract: “Suicide Squad” reminded me of what it felt like to go to a film simply for the sake of enjoying it. Following a group of antiheroes assembled by US Intelligence Officer Amanda Waller, the movie is one of the first of its kind to feature a group of villains as the main protagonists – with an approach that feels remarkably unique among an ever growing mass of superhero films, while still acknowledging its ties to the cinematic universe it builds upon. “Suicide Squad” is not without its flaws, however it benefits greatly from a contagious energy that offers audiences the chance to divulge in pure, unadulterated joy. (Read More) Read more …

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The Kettering Incident: Australian Television at its Finest

Take two mysterious disappearances fifteen years apart and place them in the primeval Tasmanian forest. The result is The Kettering Incident, a brooding thriller set in the small fishing village of Kettering, an hour out of Hobart. Lovers of Twin Peaks and The X-Files will be instant fans of this genre-bending series, the first full television series produced entirely in Tasmania.

Read more …

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HEAD TO HEAD REVIEW: Suicide Squad (P1 – Connor’s Verdict)

Over the course of two feature length reviews, Connor Johnston and Mike Riviere will be going head to head and sharing their own views on one of the most anticipated and divisive films of 2016: Suicide Squad

“The world changed when Superman flew across the sky. And it changed again when he didn’t.”

For the second time this year and the third time since 2013’s “Man of Steel”, Warner Brothers and DC Films have released an eagerly anticipated film – only to have it met with an outburst of mixed and negative reviews from critics labelling it as anything from ‘the best comic book movie ever made’ to (more popularly) ‘a chaotic, messy and bloated disappointment’. It is unclear if the DCEU will ever escape this perpetual cycle of poor press, but what is clear is that if its opening weekend is anything to go by, “Suicide Squad” has found victory where it counts, both financially and in the eyes of the vast majority of everyday movie-goers and comic book fans. I’m not going to engage in any debates today about the value of critics, nor speculate about a supposed conspiracy against the DCEU – but simply emphasise the importance of forming your own opinion free from pre-conceived biases, and stress how critics are only individuals trying to do the same. Read more …

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HEAD TO HEAD REVIEW: Suicide Squad (P2 – Mike’s Verdict)

Over the course of two feature length reviews, Connor Johnston and Mike Riviere will be going head to head and sharing their own views on one of the most anticipated and divisive films of 2016: Suicide Squad

Warning: Light to mild spoilers, some plot details

Let me preface everything I’m about to say with this; I went into my screening of Suicide Squad with no knowledge of other people’s criticisms, any Rotten Tomatoes score or even any knowledge of the plot beyond what the, in retrospect, exceedingly well orchestrated trailers showed off. Thus, during the screening, I was pleasantly surprised. Then mildly entertained. Then confused. And then moderately angry. Walking out of the screening, I entered a fugue state of what I can only describe as being shell-shocked. Let me say this; I actually enjoyed this movie. Correction, I enjoyed exactly 50% of it. What happened after that golden moment can only be described as feelings of resentment, betrayal and despair. Read more …

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REVIEW: Winterfall’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”

Review written by Saskia Penn and Connor Johnston:

Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” is an iconic piece of 20th Century Americana, often considered one of the greatest scripts in theatrical history. Winterfall Theatre’s current season of the classic play presents a raw, realistic, and compelling interpretation of the complex material and its utter success is owed, in no small part to the miraculous performances presented by the accomplished cast.

The three hour-long study in the dynamics of marriage is strung with an incredible, palpable tension throughout, the claustrophobic atmosphere thick with bourbon. At times highly absurd, at times strangely funny, at times genuinely frightening and at times truly challenging, this post modern giant dances like the wind on the edge between reality and illusion. Through the violent throes of breakdown, the deepest, darkest freudian truths and fantasies of the characters are revealed, allowing the audience a rare opportunity for genuine intellectual stimulation. Read more …