Online Employment: A Web of Problems

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As a Uni student, I am poor. Though the year began with an acceptable amount of cash in my pocket, currently my account is on the verge of bankruptcy. Nevertheless, I persevered and followed the idea is gaining employment. Searching for a job, it seems, is now interactive. Sites like Job in a Click, Indeed, Jobspot and LinkedIn attempt to aid in job finding online. Companies like Sheridan and Myer only accept applications and resumes online; almost every major company seems to be online now. But still, I had, and still do have, trouble gaining employment.

This is where the issue lies. Having employment opportunities branded over the Internet is a great way for employees and employers to save time, money and effort. It also saves paper by avoiding the need to print CVs and resumes. Online employment also increases accessibility in a new technological age. However, there are flaws to this system of hiring. When you send a resume via an account or email you are merely a number on a screen. Sure, you can have a photo and lots of experience, but because applying online takes less time and less effort, a greater number of applicants can get in meaning you are one face in a million.

 

For companies that are now fully invested in online applications it is also bad news for people who have no access to the Internet, like the homeless or those situated within wifi blackspots. And creating a profile is painful. You think you can make one and that will be the end of it but it’s not. There isn’t one site for jobs, there are several. Therefore a company may only accept one website that another company does not. And hence you have to have a number of different accounts fragmented across the Internet just for one job. Personally, the idea of applying for jobs online repulses me and the practicality of it is questionable. So for the sake of the student population, I hope that this will be phased out or changed for the better. Because currently, we’re screwed.

 

Being a uni student is difficult financially; you are cast off in to the unknown world often with your parents giving you very little when it comes to monetary support. So finding a job that is close to where you live and complements your full time uni days is ideal to accommodate for such a situation. However, uni students are often young and inexperienced in the work place. Which is why online platforms can strike them out so easily. One can’t execute their charisma or express their personality adequately over a 2 page document, traits that are often the reason young people are employed over the truly experienced applicants.

 

Hence, for young people at least, employment over the internet is a damning process. Though it’s administrative convenience and time efficiency is appealing on the surface, once you dig deeper you will find an array of issues and flaws associated to these websites. Online is sometimes for the better but for this aspect of employment, it most definitely is not.

Hugh Murray

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